Re: Class 2 PCB shrinking

Steve - Probably a little off topic from signal integrity, but sometimes 
signaling issues can have a common root on very fine feature geometries, so 
perhaps others on the list might find this useful.

One issue I've encountered regarding scaling, especially on large boards, is 
double sided placement, particularly when you have tighter pitched components 
that reside on the perimeter, close to the edges on the 'second' pass.  The 
first pass and going through a reflow cycle can 'shrink' the board possibly 
asymmetrically (more so in x- or y-) on the order of a tenth or so of a mil per 
inch, or 3-5um per 25mm.  You mention having the BGA in the center of the 
pattern which would tend to be more immune from this condition.  If this is 
your first pass placement, then you may have a different problem.  You note 
that the board edges have shrunk or are just smaller than expected, but 
hopefully you aren't using the board edges as a reference for your stencil 
pattern as the routed edge of a PCB tends to be the least accurate dimension on 
a PCB.  If that is critical for some reason, it should not be routed, but 
milled.  It is typically easier (and cheaper!) to not use the board edge to 
reference anything critical.  Stencils should be aligned optically especially 
with fine feature sizes and geometries.  

On some sensitive (tight geometry) contact patterns that have to mechanically 
align with mechanical fixturing, I'll define the artwork pattern to the 
critical alignment features with a fab note such as the following:

7. 'D' and 'E' holes referenced to be located +/-0.04mm relative to artwork 
pattern (0.30mm pads) on Layer 1 (See Detail 'A').  Fiducials provided (0.76mm 
dia.) to facilitate optical drilling to achieve required tolerances.

You are trying to place solderpaste on these pads and in so doing are trying to 
align your stencil to the pattern.  If you are doing this using mechanical 
dowels then you should specify the accuracy of those NPTHs to your features of 
interest.  Talk to your board shop about what it is you want and they can 
likely help.

...mike

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Bni I
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 1:41 PM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Class 2 PCB shrinking

Hi
My 12Layer PCB has been manufactured according IPC 6012 & IPC 6000 Class 2.

I measured my PCB and it is 100-200 um smaller than the stencil.

   - BGA in the center og the PCB
   - 100 um difference on the  edges, in direction to to board outline.

And I can not solder my SMD's.

The manufacturer says, that this is accepted by the IPC-2222 Section 9.1.5.
or Table 9-1.

Which says
Up to 450mm (my board biggest dimension ~400mm)

Class 1: 0.35mm
Class 2: 0.25mm
Class 3: 0.15mm


How could the standard so tolerant to be?
How could one produce a product with 0.5 mm pitch BGA?

Should give more strict constraint, than the IPC standard? Is this a common 
thing?

Thanks in advance
Steve


PCB
dmarc-noreply 4 years 11 months 27 days

2 answers


The best answer


You can select the best answer for current question!
Answered byGert.Havermann 4 years 11 months 22 days
Hi Steve,
usually the Stencil is much larger than the PCV and is attached to some sort of 
Frame in the Stencil Printer. Then the Alignment of Stencil and Copper features 
is done optically using fiducial marks on both PCB and Stencil. The PCB 
feducials need to be Copper features for devcent accuracy as each Layer of the 
PCB is done in a separate Process and thus pisotopning tolerances and 
geometrical tolerances apply.
PCB houses usually hand out Designrules that contain all tolerances they can 
handle (Copper-to-Soldermask, Copper-to-PCB_edge, Copper-to-Plated Drill, 
Copper to unplated drill...). Tighter tolerances most often result in higher 
cost, thus you need to know the tolerances before you start your design. 
Especially the Copper-to-Soldermask tolerance can hurt you bad if the openings 
aren't matched to the tolerance.

Back to your question, if you have a stencil that has about the size of the 
PBC, then you must be talking about tome Prototype PCB with Prototype Stencil. 
These must be aligned manually. I prefer to use larger Stencil as it is easier 
to handle, but for some reason Prototype PCB Houses like to use the same Size 
for PCB and stencil. One way for you to align is to hand craft a Stencil 
printer. Take two PCBs of the same thickness and scotchtape them to the table 
in a right angle. Place your PCB into this "reference Corner" and align the 
stencil. Then Scotchtape the Stencil to one of the reference PCBs.
If you component are very close to the edge, then there is not much room for 
the scotchtape (that’s why I prefer larger stencils).

BR
Gert


Answered bybillh 4 years 11 months 27 days
Without detracting from Mike's comments (which are good, as far as I can tell), 
I have a couple of observations:
1. If the finished board doesn't meet your shrinkage requirements, reference to 
an IPC spec that has little correlation to your needs, seems more like a CYA 
operation.
2. I think you need to look at X-Y CTE.  If the material is shrinking more than 
you want to, it's a material issue more than a fabricator issue (though they're 
supposed to help with that).  Stated succinctly, X-Y CTE is your problem.  If 
you tell me the material you're using offline, I *might* be able to make a 
recommendation.
 
Bill Hargin  
Director of North American Sales and Marketing
Nan Ya Copper-Clad Laminates
billh@xxxxxxxxxxxxx   ?  425-301-4425  ?  Skype: bill.hargin

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Mike Sharpes (Redacted sender "msharpes" for DMARC)
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:40 PM
To: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Class 2 PCB shrinking

Steve - Probably a little off topic from signal integrity, but sometimes 
signaling issues can have a common root on very fine feature geometries, so 
perhaps others on the list might find this useful.

One issue I've encountered regarding scaling, especially on large boards, is 
double sided placement, particularly when you have tighter pitched components 
that reside on the perimeter, close to the edges on the 'second' pass.  The 
first pass and going through a reflow cycle can 'shrink' the board possibly 
asymmetrically (more so in x- or y-) on the order of a tenth or so of a mil per 
inch, or 3-5um per 25mm.  You mention having the BGA in the center of the 
pattern which would tend to be more immune from this condition.  If this is 
your first pass placement, then you may have a different problem.  You note 
that the board edges have shrunk or are just smaller than expected, but 
hopefully you aren't using the board edges as a reference for your stencil 
pattern as the routed edge of a PCB tends to be the least accurate dimension on 
a PCB.  If that is critical for some reason, it should not be routed, but 
milled.  It is typically easier (and cheaper!) to not use the board edge to 
referenc  e anything critical.  Stencils should be aligned optically especially 
with fine feature sizes and geometries.  

On some sensitive (tight geometry) contact patterns that have to mechanically 
align with mechanical fixturing, I'll define the artwork pattern to the 
critical alignment features with a fab note such as the following:

7. 'D' and 'E' holes referenced to be located +/-0.04mm relative to artwork 
pattern (0.30mm pads) on Layer 1 (See Detail 'A').  Fiducials provided (0.76mm 
dia.) to facilitate optical drilling to achieve required tolerances.

You are trying to place solderpaste on these pads and in so doing are trying to 
align your stencil to the pattern.  If you are doing this using mechanical 
dowels then you should specify the accuracy of those NPTHs to your features of 
interest.  Talk to your board shop about what it is you want and they can 
likely help.

...mike

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Bni I
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 1:41 PM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Class 2 PCB shrinking

Hi
My 12Layer PCB has been manufactured according IPC 6012 & IPC 6000 Class 2.

I measured my PCB and it is 100-200 um smaller than the stencil.

   - BGA in the center og the PCB
   - 100 um difference on the  edges, in direction to to board outline.

And I can not solder my SMD's.

The manufacturer says, that this is accepted by the IPC-2222 Section 9.1.5.
or Table 9-1.

Which says
Up to 450mm (my board biggest dimension ~400mm)

Class 1: 0.35mm
Class 2: 0.25mm
Class 3: 0.15mm


How could the standard so tolerant to be?
How could one produce a product with 0.5 mm pitch BGA?

Should give more strict constraint, than the IPC standard? Is this a common 
thing?

Thanks in advance
Steve