Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS jitter of 
serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS jitter 
of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010.... clock 
pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer like low 
frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
emcesd 5 years 2 months

7 answers


The best answer


You can select the best answer for current question!
Answered byemcesd 5 years 2 months 29 days
Hi Ransom, Jose and bill

Thanks a lot for your professional advice.  I see the real problems is the 
bandwidth difference between scope and SSA. the RMS jitter measured by SSA can 
be a good debug purpose, but it is not the real value.

Tesla








At 2016-02-19 05:03:29, "Ransom Stephens"  wrote:
If the spec an has an SSB (single sideband) app, you can integrate the
sideband spectrum to get, as mentioned by Jose, the band-limited rms RJ.
Jose also pointed out that the result probably won't be more than 20-30%
comparable to other techniques. You'll probably come in low. Fine. Now use
your low bandwidth scope on a data pattern that's clock like, but at a low
enough rate that your scope can swallow it, you know, 111000111000...or
whatever fits. 
If the histograms look Gaussian, take the rms of the histogram and compare
it to what you got with the spectrum analyzer. Average them, and figure
you're still under-estimating, but might be within 25% of the "truth."
It's probably cheaper to rent a high bandwidth scope from Tek, Lec, or Key
and use their fancy jitter analysis code to get all your jitter numbers than
to rent a phase noise analyzer--and still be band limited. If you have real
worries that your RJ might be way too high, study the reference clock. Truly
random jitter comes from thermal sources and shouldn't be very high. If it
is, you have other problems in that clock.
Ransom
_____________________________
Ransom W. Stephens, Ph.D.
Signal Integrity Sage
Ransom's Notes: Training, content, and consulting/analysis since 2005
www.ransomsnotes.com 

Measure of Things - Science & Technology blog at Electronics Design News:
science from the perspective of a technologist, technology from the
perspective of a scientist 
Eye on the Standards - Keeping you up to date on developments in high speed
specifications
Twitting @ransomstephens
LinkedIn, Facebook and all that stuff

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Tesla
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 1:19 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS
jitter of serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS
jitter of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010....
clock pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer like
low frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
Answered byal 5 years 2 months
In years past I used the spectrum analyzer in conjunction with real time 
sampling scope for a different purpose.    The spectrum analyzer provided 
insight into the SSB spectrum of the PLL loop, revealing any peaking or spurs 
near the carrier along with confirming the loop dynamics were set correctly.   
The spectrum analyzer is also useful for examine RJ spectral content as a 
function of pattern transition density.   
Back in they 90â??s during my Wavecrest venture, I recall Mike Li doing a 
project on correlation which, if I recall correctly did not go that well in 
estimating RJ versus sampling scope or a TIA approach.

- Al



       





Products for the Signal Integrity Practitioner



Alfred P. Neves
Chief Technologist

 

Office: 503-679-2429

www.wildrivertech.com 
 2015 Best In Design&Test Finalist








On Feb 18, 2016, at 5:48 PM, Tesla  wrote:

Hi Ransom, Jose and bill

Thanks a lot for your professional advice.  I see the real problems is the 
bandwidth difference between scope and SSA. the RMS jitter measured by SSA 
can be a good debug purpose, but it is not the real value.

Tesla








At 2016-02-19 05:03:29, "Ransom Stephens"  wrote:
If the spec an has an SSB (single sideband) app, you can integrate the
sideband spectrum to get, as mentioned by Jose, the band-limited rms RJ.
Jose also pointed out that the result probably won't be more than 20-30%
comparable to other techniques. You'll probably come in low. Fine. Now use
your low bandwidth scope on a data pattern that's clock like, but at a low
enough rate that your scope can swallow it, you know, 111000111000...or
whatever fits. 
If the histograms look Gaussian, take the rms of the histogram and compare
it to what you got with the spectrum analyzer. Average them, and figure
you're still under-estimating, but might be within 25% of the "truth."
It's probably cheaper to rent a high bandwidth scope from Tek, Lec, or Key
and use their fancy jitter analysis code to get all your jitter numbers than
to rent a phase noise analyzer--and still be band limited. If you have real
worries that your RJ might be way too high, study the reference clock. Truly
random jitter comes from thermal sources and shouldn't be very high. If it
is, you have other problems in that clock.
Ransom
_____________________________
Ransom W. Stephens, Ph.D.
Signal Integrity Sage
Ransom's Notes: Training, content, and consulting/analysis since 2005
www.ransomsnotes.com 

Measure of Things - Science & Technology blog at Electronics Design News:
science from the perspective of a technologist, technology from the
perspective of a scientist 
Eye on the Standards - Keeping you up to date on developments in high speed
specifications
Twitting @ransomstephens
LinkedIn, Facebook and all that stuff

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Tesla
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 1:19 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS
jitter of serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS
jitter of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010....
clock pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer like
low frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
Answered bydmarc-noreply 5 years 2 months
" why is the serdes jitter specified for a particular freq
range like 12KHz to 20MHz"

The upper frequency limit is based on the bandwidth of the TX PLL. All 
jitter frequency components above that will be attenuated by the TX PLL.
The lower frequency limit is based on the bandwidth of the RX CDR (clock 
data recovery unit). All jitter frequency components below that will be 
tracked (therefore attenuated) by the RX CDR.
The jitter frequency components between the two limits will close the 
signal eye.

Thanks,
Vinu


On 02/18/2016 03:31 PM, Hithesh wrote:
If using scope for jitter measurement, make sure you calculate the scope
jitter noise floor. For a 13GHz scope we use, the jitter noise floor is
6pS. The typical spec is less than 3pS.
Related question - why is the serdes jitter specified for a particular freq
range like 12KHz to 20MHz.
What happens in this freq range.
Is this is the PLL loop frequency?

On Thu, Feb 18, 2016 at 1:03 PM, Ransom Stephens 
wrote:

If the spec an has an SSB (single sideband) app, you can integrate the
sideband spectrum to get, as mentioned by Jose, the band-limited rms RJ.
Jose also pointed out that the result probably won't be more than 20-30%
comparable to other techniques. You'll probably come in low. Fine. Now use
your low bandwidth scope on a data pattern that's clock like, but at a low
enough rate that your scope can swallow it, you know, 111000111000...or
whatever fits.
If the histograms look Gaussian, take the rms of the histogram and compare
it to what you got with the spectrum analyzer. Average them, and figure
you're still under-estimating, but might be within 25% of the "truth."
It's probably cheaper to rent a high bandwidth scope from Tek, Lec, or Key
and use their fancy jitter analysis code to get all your jitter numbers
than
to rent a phase noise analyzer--and still be band limited. If you have real
worries that your RJ might be way too high, study the reference clock.
Truly
random jitter comes from thermal sources and shouldn't be very high. If it
is, you have other problems in that clock.
Ransom
_____________________________
Ransom W. Stephens, Ph.D.
Signal Integrity Sage
Ransom's Notes: Training, content, and consulting/analysis since 2005
www.ransomsnotes.com

Measure of Things - Science & Technology blog at Electronics Design News:
science from the perspective of a technologist, technology from the
perspective of a scientist
Eye on the Standards - Keeping you up to date on developments in high speed
specifications
Twitting @ransomstephens
LinkedIn, Facebook and all that stuff

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Tesla
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 1:19 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS
jitter of serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS
jitter of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010....
clock pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer
like
low frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
Answered byhitheshn 5 years 2 months
If using scope for jitter measurement, make sure you calculate the scope
jitter noise floor. For a 13GHz scope we use, the jitter noise floor is
6pS. The typical spec is less than 3pS.
Related question - why is the serdes jitter specified for a particular freq
range like 12KHz to 20MHz.
What happens in this freq range.
Is this is the PLL loop frequency?

On Thu, Feb 18, 2016 at 1:03 PM, Ransom Stephens 
wrote:

If the spec an has an SSB (single sideband) app, you can integrate the
sideband spectrum to get, as mentioned by Jose, the band-limited rms RJ.
Jose also pointed out that the result probably won't be more than 20-30%
comparable to other techniques. You'll probably come in low. Fine. Now use
your low bandwidth scope on a data pattern that's clock like, but at a low
enough rate that your scope can swallow it, you know, 111000111000...or
whatever fits.
If the histograms look Gaussian, take the rms of the histogram and compare
it to what you got with the spectrum analyzer. Average them, and figure
you're still under-estimating, but might be within 25% of the "truth."
It's probably cheaper to rent a high bandwidth scope from Tek, Lec, or Key
and use their fancy jitter analysis code to get all your jitter numbers
than
to rent a phase noise analyzer--and still be band limited. If you have real
worries that your RJ might be way too high, study the reference clock.
Truly
random jitter comes from thermal sources and shouldn't be very high. If it
is, you have other problems in that clock.
Ransom
_____________________________
Ransom W. Stephens, Ph.D.
Signal Integrity Sage
Ransom's Notes: Training, content, and consulting/analysis since 2005
www.ransomsnotes.com

Measure of Things - Science & Technology blog at Electronics Design News:
science from the perspective of a technologist, technology from the
perspective of a scientist
Eye on the Standards - Keeping you up to date on developments in high speed
specifications
Twitting @ransomstephens
LinkedIn, Facebook and all that stuff

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Tesla
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 1:19 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS
jitter of serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS
jitter of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010....
clock pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer
like
low frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
Answered byransom 5 years 2 months
If the spec an has an SSB (single sideband) app, you can integrate the
sideband spectrum to get, as mentioned by Jose, the band-limited rms RJ.
Jose also pointed out that the result probably won't be more than 20-30%
comparable to other techniques. You'll probably come in low. Fine. Now use
your low bandwidth scope on a data pattern that's clock like, but at a low
enough rate that your scope can swallow it, you know, 111000111000...or
whatever fits. 
If the histograms look Gaussian, take the rms of the histogram and compare
it to what you got with the spectrum analyzer. Average them, and figure
you're still under-estimating, but might be within 25% of the "truth."
It's probably cheaper to rent a high bandwidth scope from Tek, Lec, or Key
and use their fancy jitter analysis code to get all your jitter numbers than
to rent a phase noise analyzer--and still be band limited. If you have real
worries that your RJ might be way too high, study the reference clock. Truly
random jitter comes from thermal sources and shouldn't be very high. If it
is, you have other problems in that clock.
Ransom
_____________________________
Ransom W. Stephens, Ph.D.
Signal Integrity Sage
Ransom's Notes: Training, content, and consulting/analysis since 2005
www.ransomsnotes.com 

Measure of Things - Science & Technology blog at Electronics Design News:
science from the perspective of a technologist, technology from the
perspective of a scientist 
Eye on the Standards - Keeping you up to date on developments in high speed
specifications
Twitting @ransomstephens
LinkedIn, Facebook and all that stuff

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Tesla
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 1:19 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS
jitter of serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS
jitter of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010....
clock pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer like
low frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
Answered byjose.moreira 5 years 2 months
What you are proposing is a phase noise measurement. You can convert it to a 
random jitter values but there are several caveats.

1) You still need to remove all periodic jitter components from your spectrum 
measurement to get the phase noise.
2) You will always need to define a frequency integration range on your phase 
noise measurement. An oscilloscope uses all its available bandwidth. This will 
be a correlation problem with oscilloscope based measurements.

The measurement is completely valid but expect correlation issues if someone 
later does a measurement of the same device on an oscilloscope with a high 
enough frequency and some jitter separation SW. It is not that the random 
jitter from the phase noise measurement is wrong, you just need to make sure 
you compare apples to apples when comparing values.

I use a lot of times a phase noise measurement like you describe to specify 
random jitter (with a specified integration range). The reason is that it is 
easy for the end customer to make the same measurement on his own and 
correlate, while using an oscilloscope it might be more complicated since 
between oscilloscope vendors and SW you can get differences on the jitter 
separation depending on the situation and especially for very low random jitter 
values.

Jose

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Tesla
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 10:19 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Measure RMS jitter of Serdes using spectrum analyzer

Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS jitter of 
serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS jitter 
of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010.... clock 
pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer like low 
frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla
Answered bysio2man1 5 years 2 months
Tesla,
If you want accurate measurements below a ps then use a SSA.
Oscilloscopes have too much A to D noise and only the very latest have a 
timebase accurate enough
to make a meaningful measurement below a few picoseconds.
Research it, Frequency domain measurements are orders of magnitude 
better than Time domain measurements.

Some of the Higher end N@'s can measure IPN directly, like the R&S FSV-K40
They have a tool on their website that will take your S@ spot 
measurements and convert themto the time domain.

AGilent makes a decent phase noise system, E5052B. (85k to 135K)
BNC has a PC based box that performs about the same as the E5052B for 
under 35k.

Use a 2:1 balun if measuring differential signals.

(At Sun we verified our SERDES measurements from the BERT with the 
101010 pattern, measured on the SSA,
Aeroflex PN9500).

Good Luck

-Bill

On 2/18/2016 1:19 AM, Tesla wrote:
Hi Experts

I am curious about a idea using spectrum analyzer to measure the RMS jitter 
of serdes. Because we do not have a high enough bandwidth scope.
For low frequency clock, we can use spectrum method to measure the RMS jitter 
of clock source. Suppose we let the Serdes is outputing 101010.... clock 
pattern. Can the RMS jitter be measured using spectrum analyzer like low 
frequency clock?

Thanks a lot for your advice.

Tesla