Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


lwrbakro 5 years 2 months 14 days

17 answers


The best answer


You can select the best answer for current question!
Answered byvasudevan.duraiswamy 5 years 2 months 13 days
Hi

Try to measure the voltage surge during power ON, this may be more than 20V 
with the cold start.

Tantalum capacitors are used together with Electrolytic, or TVS diode can be 
used in parallel to take care of voltage spike

Reliability of Tantalum improved a lot with new types of Tantalum, like 
Tantalum MnO2 and Tantalum Polymer.

Please go through below and some more google search would help, failure 
analysis would help to get correct solution

http://powerelectronics.com/passive-components/tantalum-polymer-capacitors-achieve-higher-voltage-ratings

http://www.kemet.com/Lists/TechnicalArticles/Attachments/199/2014%20EDFA%20Tantalum%20Cap%20Failure%20Analysis%20Review%20by%20Javaid%20Qazi.pdf


Have a Nice Day

Regards

Vasu

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Bni I
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 9:20 PM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the first power 
up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bycharles 5 years 2 months 14 days
There are many mechanisms that impact this, but first is that the ripple 
current rating is typically based on internal heating, so it depends on the 
operating temperature and also harmonic content. The ripple current rating is 
typically for a single frequency and I suspect if you calculate the equivalent 
heating using an FFT you aren't close, but way above the rating. The capacitors 
are also sensitive to overvoltage and negative voltage as well as surge 
current.  

It would seem that you didn't adequately derate the part. For long life, I 
would suggest never exceeding 75% voltage or 50% ripple current and this would 
be at the highest operating temperature. I don't know where the part is used, 
but if it is the output of a regulator, slowing down the soft-start will 
reduce, but not eliminate the inrush.  

If you can tolerate the very low ESR, you might try to stack a few ceramics in 
a 1206 or 1210 case size. They will take more punishment. I don't know your 
application, so perhaps you can also live with reduced capacitance, so that you 
don't need to stack them. If there is a reliability concern over stacking the 
caps, some companies can assemble them into a lead frame for you.

It's good you found this now, as it would have been a time bomb. It would be 
exacerbated in time due to capacitor aging.

Charles Hymowitz - Managing Director
AEi Systems
Charles@xxxxxxxx
(310) 216-1144
(310) 863-8034 (M)

http://www.aeng.com - Analytical Heavy Lifting



-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Chris Belting
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 11:09 AM
To: telegrapher9@xxxxxxxxx; buenoshun@xxxxxxxxx
Cc: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

Perhaps a little caution is worthwhile if changing to a ceramic. There are some 
nice write-ups regarding how small sized ceramics rapidly lose their rated 
capacitance as the voltage approaches the rated value. This was printed in the 
Jan 2013 issue of EDN:  "Temp and voltage variation of ceramic caps, or why 
your 4.7-uF part becomes 0.33 uF", (also available on Maxim's website). Just be 
sure to check the capacitor manufacturer's DC bias curve.

The capacitor vendors recommendation you mentioned for including series 
resistance reduces the instantaneous current but that can also be managed by 
controlling the dV/dt. As many have alluded to during start-up, hot swap, etc. 
instantaneous application of voltage results in impressive currents: 
100uF*12V/100us = 12A. For a high-reliability Tantalum (solid: CSR, CSS, CWR) 
the recommendation is to add resistance to keep this at 0.1 ohm/V or 10A max. 3 
ohms/V is only 0.33A. If the input comes up faster than 3.6ms you are exceeding 
the vendors guidance.

Chris Belting

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Dave Cuthbert
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 10:24 AM
To: buenoshun@xxxxxxxxx
Cc: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

I would look at replacing it with a ceramic cap (unless you are relying on the 
Tantalum cap ESR).
A quick look at Digikey in the 1206 package shows X5R ceramic caps of 47 uF 
rated for 16V and 25V.

   Dave C

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 9:47 AM, Istvan Nagy  wrote:

Hi,

What do you mean by "first power on"? Connecting or reconnecting the 
power cable, or pressing the power button?
When the board is still hot from the previous run (e.g. you didn't 
connect fan or heatsink on your prototype), and you reconnect the 
power cable, this can easily happen.
Make sure your board does not get too hot during normal run.
Only reconnect the power cable after it cooled down.
For electrical/functional reasons it is also good to wait 5s...30sec 
before reapplying the power, for letting registers clear and do hard reset.

Istvan Nagy


-----Original Message-----
From: Bni I
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 7:50 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first 
power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the 
first power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the 
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bydoug 5 years 2 months 14 days
Hi Everyone,

Sometimes inductance in the connection to the capacitor can resultant 
in a resonant L-C induced overvoltage on powerup. I have seen >50% 
overvoltage this way. 

Doug

Douglas C. Smith
Answered byChris.Belting 5 years 2 months 14 days
Perhaps a little caution is worthwhile if changing to a ceramic. There are some 
nice write-ups regarding how small sized ceramics rapidly lose their rated 
capacitance as the voltage approaches the rated value. This was printed in the 
Jan 2013 issue of EDN:  "Temp and voltage variation of ceramic caps, or why 
your 4.7-uF part becomes 0.33 uF", (also available on Maxim's website). Just be 
sure to check the capacitor manufacturer's DC bias curve.

The capacitor vendors recommendation you mentioned for including series 
resistance reduces the instantaneous current but that can also be managed by 
controlling the dV/dt. As many have alluded to during start-up, hot swap, etc. 
instantaneous application of voltage results in impressive currents: 
100uF*12V/100us = 12A. For a high-reliability Tantalum (solid: CSR, CSS, CWR) 
the recommendation is to add resistance to keep this at 0.1 ohm/V or 10A max. 3 
ohms/V is only 0.33A. If the input comes up faster than 3.6ms you are exceeding 
the vendors guidance.

Chris Belting

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Dave Cuthbert
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 10:24 AM
To: buenoshun@xxxxxxxxx
Cc: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

I would look at replacing it with a ceramic cap (unless you are relying on the 
Tantalum cap ESR).
A quick look at Digikey in the 1206 package shows X5R ceramic caps of 47 uF 
rated for 16V and 25V.

   Dave C

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 9:47 AM, Istvan Nagy  wrote:

Hi,

What do you mean by "first power on"? Connecting or reconnecting the 
power cable, or pressing the power button?
When the board is still hot from the previous run (e.g. you didn't 
connect fan or heatsink on your prototype), and you reconnect the 
power cable, this can easily happen.
Make sure your board does not get too hot during normal run.
Only reconnect the power cable after it cooled down.
For electrical/functional reasons it is also good to wait 5s...30sec 
before reapplying the power, for letting registers clear and do hard reset.

Istvan Nagy


-----Original Message-----
From: Bni I
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 7:50 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first 
power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the 
first power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the 
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered byleeritchey 5 years 2 months 14 days
I had a  case where this happened in a dense card cage and set fire to the 
machine!

I only use organic tantalum now.  They do not short circuit when they fail.

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Doug Smith
Sent: Thursday, February 4, 2016 3:48 PM
To: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; Doug Brooks 

Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

Hi Doug and the group,

If I told you of some of my experiences over the years with air traffic control 
equipment design it would rival the exploding cap story or worse. 

Doug Smith
University of Oxford
Department for Continuing Education
Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Answered bycchalmers 5 years 2 months 14 days
As Alfred said, 2x Working voltage is the normal derating for Tants.

I don't know your application but you could consider using a 47uF with a higher 
working voltage or 
 a ceramic cap e.g 16V 100uF 1210.  They can be used up to their WV

C
-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of alfred1520list
Sent: 04 February 2016 15:56
To: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; Bni I; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

I think 20V part on 12V circuit probably is your problem. We had some cap 
explosions and investigated and learn that you should have at least twice the 
working voltage so try 25V or 35V cap.
On February 4, 2016 7:50:15 AM PST, Bni I  wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V 
input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first 
power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the 
first power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the 
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bydoug 5 years 2 months 14 days
Hi Doug and the group,

If I told you of some of my experiences over the years with air traffic 
control equipment design it would rival the exploding cap story or 
worse. 

Doug Smith
University of Oxford
Department for Continuing Education
Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Answered bydbrooks9 5 years 2 months 14 days
I worked in a company once where we had caps burning up in airplane 
cockpits. Gets the airlines attention real quick.

The solution (which felt like a crutch to me) was to select capacitors 
with low ESR. High ESR capacitors generated I^2*R heat and melted 
explosively. Low ESR caps generated heat just low enough not to explode.

Not particularly satisfying, but we all have been flying on planes with 
that fix!!

Our caps were encapsulated in foam, so the heat couldn't dissipate.

Doug




Bni I wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bytvanriper 5 years 2 months 14 days
Hi,

Is it possible the startup ripple current is much higher than the expected 
operating ripple current.

Thurman

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 4, 2016, at 11:04 AM, Gene Glick  wrote:

On 2/4/2016 10:50 AM, Bni I wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.

any chance they are in reverse polarity?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-RZ5RTAdSg
Answered bygglick 5 years 2 months 14 days
On 2/4/2016 10:50 AM, Bni I wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


any chance they are in reverse polarity?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-RZ5RTAdSg
Answered byken.patterson 5 years 2 months 14 days
Be careful of inductive "kick back" as this can momentarily reverse current
through the cap and damage it.  

-Ken

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On
Behalf Of Bni I
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 10:50 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bytelegrapher9 5 years 2 months 14 days
I would look at replacing it with a ceramic cap (unless you are relying on
the Tantalum cap ESR).
A quick look at Digikey in the 1206 package shows X5R ceramic caps of 47 uF
rated for 16V and 25V.

   Dave C

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 9:47 AM, Istvan Nagy  wrote:

Hi,

What do you mean by "first power on"? Connecting or reconnecting the power
cable, or pressing the power button?
When the board is still hot from the previous run (e.g. you didn't connect
fan or heatsink on your prototype), and you reconnect the power cable, this
can easily happen.
Make sure your board does not get too hot during normal run.
Only reconnect the power cable after it cooled down.
For electrical/functional reasons it is also good to wait 5s...30sec before
reapplying the power, for letting registers clear and do hard reset.

Istvan Nagy


-----Original Message-----
From: Bni I
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 7:50 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power
on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bycorley 5 years 2 months 14 days
Jerry gave you some good Tantalum articles to study.  If it's not a 
defective lot or bad cap manufacturer and you're having a 20% failure 
rate with a 20V rated Tantalum on a 12V circuit then either the 
capacitor is mounted backwards as Gene mentioned, or there is a peak 
voltage higher than you expect at power-on.  For the reversed voltage 
check the capacitor markings to find the positive end and check with a 
voltmeter to see if the voltage is reversed compared to what the 
capacitor is expecting.  It's also possible the assembler accidentally 
inserted them the wrong way even if you designed them correctly.  For 
the peak voltage at startup look at the voltage on the capacitor at 
power-up using a scope to see how high the voltage spike is at power-up.

I studied failure causes and failure rates as part of designing for high 
reliability for building Telecom systems that sometimes stay in service 
for 20-25 years.  As a result of the research we designed out standard 
Tantalum caps whenever possible in favor of ceramic or other more 
reliable types when the available capacitance values would allow it.  In 
addition to the higher failure rate for Tantalums they tend to fail 
shorted and will take out the board while ceramics usually fail open and 
often allow the circuit to continue operating if there are  other 
parallel capacitors on the supply.

I should mention the type of circuit matters too, the characteristics of 
each type of capacitor will also determine which types will work for 
your particular circuit requirements.

Hope this helps.


Chuck Corley




On 2016-02-04 07:50, Bni I wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V 
input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first 
power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the 
first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered byken 5 years 2 months 14 days
I standardly use a 30% overrating on Tants, and have never had a problem.
Surge current rating is always used.
2 cents -
Ken

-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On
Behalf Of Chris Chalmers
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 9:04 AM
To: alfred1520list@xxxxxxxxx; lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

As Alfred said, 2x Working voltage is the normal derating for Tants.

I don't know your application but you could consider using a 47uF with a
higher working voltage or  a ceramic cap e.g 16V 100uF 1210.  They can be
used up to their WV

C
-----Original Message-----
From: si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:si-list-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On
Behalf Of alfred1520list
Sent: 04 February 2016 15:56
To: lwrbakro@xxxxxxxxx; Bni I; si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: Tantalum explode

I think 20V part on 12V circuit probably is your problem. We had some cap
explosions and investigated and learn that you should have at least twice
the working voltage so try 25V or 35V cap.
On February 4, 2016 7:50:15 AM PST, Bni I  wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V 
input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first 
power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the 
first power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the 
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bybuenoshun 5 years 2 months 14 days
Hi,

What do you mean by "first power on"? Connecting or reconnecting the power 
cable, or pressing the power button?
When the board is still hot from the previous run (e.g. you didn't connect 
fan or heatsink on your prototype), and you reconnect the power cable, this 
can easily happen.
Make sure your board does not get too hot during normal run.
Only reconnect the power cable after it cooled down.
For electrical/functional reasons it is also good to wait 5s...30sec before 
reapplying the power, for letting registers clear and do hard reset.

Istvan Nagy


-----Original Message----- 
From: Bni I
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 7:50 AM
To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [SI-LIST] Tantalum explode

Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve


Answered bydmarc-noreply 5 years 2 months 14 days
Saw some good note on determined how much derating is needed :

AVX
http://www.avx.com/docs/techinfo/VoltageDeratingRulesforSolidTantalumandNiobiumCapacitors.pdf
( showing that in certain application, the ESR dictate 300% derating, as shown 
in the example )

Kemet 
http://www.kemet.com/Lists/filestore/Derating%20Guidelings%20for%20Tantalum%202011%20(3).pdf
They offer 100% pre-screened parts that try to eliminate this expected behavior 
for failure due to initial power-on.

Regards,


On Feb 4, 2016, at 8:04 AM, Gene Glick  wrote:

On 2/4/2016 10:50 AM, Bni I wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


any chance they are in reverse polarity?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-RZ5RTAdSg
Answered byalfred1520list 5 years 2 months 14 days
I think 20V part on 12V circuit probably is your problem. We had some cap 
explosions and investigated and learn that you should have at least twice the 
working voltage so try 25V or 35V cap.
On February 4, 2016 7:50:15 AM PST, Bni I  wrote:
Hi experts
I am having issues with my 100uF 20V 1206 tantalum capacitor for 12V
input.
The ripple is lower, but close to the limit (said in the DS) [~150mA]

I am facing 20% failure.Most of the time, it explodes on the first
power on.
Sadly I have a lot of PCB without any hope to change the PCB.


I haven't found much on the application of the tantalum.

I found that there is some condensation/crystallization time on the
first
power up.
The article suggest to use 3xVin [Ohm] serial resistor.


I am not satisfied with this solution. I think it does not help on the
problem.
It only mitigates the problem and it will blow up in my customer hands.


Any experience or artical/book are welcome.

Thanks
Steve